You Can Pretty Much Ignore Professional Credentials

Be careful when considering expertise only based on credentials or length of time in a profession.

These are both dated ways of thinking and encouraged by bureaucratic organizations such as unions or income generating professional associations designed to encourage ladder climbing.

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD, or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice.

I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name.

And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing.

Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

Keep an open mind.

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice. I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name. And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing. Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

Keep an open mind.

Chuck J. Rylant, MBA, CFP,

Be careful when considering expertise only based on credentials or length of time in a profession. These are both dated ways of thinking and encouraged by bureaucratic organizations such as unions or income generating professional associations designed to encourage ladder climbing.

 

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

 

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice. I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

 

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

 

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name. And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

 

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

 

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

 

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing. Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

 

Keep an open mind.

 

Chuck J. Rylant, MBA, CFP,

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