You Can Pretty Much Ignore Professional Credentials

Be careful when considering expertise only based on credentials or length of time in a profession.

These are both dated ways of thinking and encouraged by bureaucratic organizations such as unions or income generating professional associations designed to encourage ladder climbing.

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD, or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice.

I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name.

And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing.

Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

Keep an open mind.

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice. I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name. And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing. Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

Keep an open mind.

Chuck J. Rylant, MBA, CFP,

Be careful when considering expertise only based on credentials or length of time in a profession. These are both dated ways of thinking and encouraged by bureaucratic organizations such as unions or income generating professional associations designed to encourage ladder climbing.

 

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

 

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice. I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

 

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

 

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name. And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

 

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

 

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

 

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing. Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

 

Keep an open mind.

 

Chuck J. Rylant, MBA, CFP,

Chris Lovato: A Fighter & Entrepreneur Success Story Against All Odds

“I paid 50 bucks for a self-defense seminar,” Chris Lovato said, “and all I remember were the takedowns and the instructor doing this weird breathing thing.”

At the end of the seminar, the instructor lined the students up and each was given a chance to knock him down.

“I’ve got this,” Chris thought because of his wrestling background. “I jumped to the front of the line and the next thing I knew I was looking up at the ceiling.”

Everyone was given one shot, but Chris snuck back in line to try again.

“He got lucky,” Chris thought. “I didn’t know what the hell happened the second time, but I ended up on my back staring up at the ceiling again. I had no idea who he was, but he fucked me up.”

That was Chris’s introduction to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and the instructor—Rickson Gracie—was one of the best fighters of all time. Continue reading “Chris Lovato: A Fighter & Entrepreneur Success Story Against All Odds”

Nicolas Gregoriades: unlocking the root of all fears and neuroses

Nicolas Gregoriades left his home in South Africa and arrived in London with only a couple of hundred bucks in his pocket. After trying another gym, he eventually discovered Roger Gracie’s Jiu-Jitsu academy.

When Nicolas knocked on the door, a tall but unassuming kid answered. “This guy doesn’t look tough at all,” Nicolas thought.

“He looked like a regular dude,” Nicolas said. “He had that foppish haircut and was kind of pale. I thought these crazy fighters were supposed to be tan, Mediterranean-looking guys.”

Nicolas had some no-gi grappling experience and had been submitting a lot of guys at home with kneebars. One of his friends knew of Roger Gracie and heard Nicolas was visiting the academy.

“If you kneebar that guy, I will call you ‘sir’ for the rest of your life,” his friend said.

“My kneebars are amazing,” the overly confident, 20-year-old Nicolas said to his friend. “Jiu-Jitsu guys don’t know kneebars.”

Roger was gracious and welcomed Nicolas into the gym during their lunchtime class.

“I’ll never forget that day,” Nicolas said. “There were only four guys in class, so I asked if I could spar with him.” Continue reading “Nicolas Gregoriades: unlocking the root of all fears and neuroses”

You Can Stop Apologizing

The luxury of wealth has unleashed a plague of political correctness in the United States.

While children in Zimbabwe are starving, people in the U.S. are arguing over which bathroom to use.

When the stakes are low, people will predictably invent a crisis to keep the drama high.

No matter what the bleeding hearts preach, everyone is not equal, nor should we pretend that everyone is the same. Continue reading “You Can Stop Apologizing”

Ryron Gracie: the secret to success in life and Jiu-Jitsu

At 12 years old, Ryron Gracie cleaned the mats in between matches at UFC 1 where Royce Gracie submitted every one of his opponents.

That event changed history and radically transformed the martial arts community. UFC 1 showcased Gracie Jiu-Jitsu to the world and planted the seeds for Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu to spread internationally.

“I had a pretty good idea how big the UFC was,” Ryron said. “Everybody at my school knew I was there and that my uncle was on TV.”

Twenty-five years later, Ryron is routinely recognized by people who are anxious to share their story of watching the early UFC fights.

“But it’s not about me,” Ryron emphasized. “It’s the name. Torrance is very much the city of the Gracie family.” Continue reading “Ryron Gracie: the secret to success in life and Jiu-Jitsu”