You Can Pretty Much Ignore Professional Credentials

Be careful when considering expertise only based on credentials or length of time in a profession.

These are both dated ways of thinking and encouraged by bureaucratic organizations such as unions or income generating professional associations designed to encourage ladder climbing.

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD, or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice.

I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name.

And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing.

Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

Keep an open mind.

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice. I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name. And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing. Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

Keep an open mind.

Chuck J. Rylant, MBA, CFP,

Be careful when considering expertise only based on credentials or length of time in a profession. These are both dated ways of thinking and encouraged by bureaucratic organizations such as unions or income generating professional associations designed to encourage ladder climbing.

 

People entrenched in these systems often feel the need to keep people from skipping rungs on the ladder and jumping all the way to the top, because it serves their own self interest of maintaining their own position in the hierarchy.

 

I can tell you from experience that the coveted MBA, JD or any other set of letters, are NOT the qualifications that makes you an expert qualified to give advice. I have an MBA and am considered a “tax expert” according to my credentials. I’ve also had business successes and failures, I’ve studied from books, seminars, and coaches and am also on the other side of the fence in providing coaching and consulting.

 

Without a doubt, the fastest way to learn business, tax, or any other skill is from lots and lots of self study and coaching from the right coach and then finally jumping in and making mistakes.

 

It is far more important that a coach/consultant has the knowledge and is the able to connect with you in a way you can learn, than all of the letters after his or her name. And time in service, which is the union way of ranking people, is often a very poor indicator of skill.

 

Many years in a profession usually leads to more experience, but often leads to complacency and laziness and the resistance to consider new ideas that young and hungry entrepreneurs are open to.

 

And in response to the comment about spending most of the time marketing instead of practicing whatever trade you’re in, welcome to the world of being a business owner.

 

I think we all naively enter a profession because we want to do the thing we do, but quickly learn that in order to run a profitable business and be able to continue helping clients, we have to spend a high percentage of the time marketing. Anyone who says otherwise has never started a business.

 

Keep an open mind.

 

Chuck J. Rylant, MBA, CFP,

How to be Above Average

Most think they are above average.

For example, in one survey 94% of college professors claim they do above average work.

Statistically, it is impossible that 94% of any group is above average.

An educated group of college professors should understand the statistical impossibility that all of them are superior, but illusory superiority leads people to believe they are more capable than they really are.

Continue reading “How to be Above Average”

Your Unconscious Limitations

img_4211We are controlled by unconscious forces that prevent us from reaching our full potential.

Regardless how hard we try, it is difficult to understand ourselves because we have no direct access to our unconscious.

Our conscious thoughts are conceived from what we are unconscious of, but that does not stop us from creating a list of reasons for our feelings.

We should, however, be suspicious of these reasons because we fabricate a story about how we feel based on unreliable information.

The narrative we tell ourselves often includes a hint of truth, yet it frequently misrepresents how we actually feel. Continue reading “Your Unconscious Limitations”

How to be Happy — Success, Money and Happiness

How to be happy

The formula for success is obsolete.

It’s the model that dictates how we’re supposed to live.

We chase success expecting that happiness is on the other end. It’s not.

But if happiness is your focus you will never find it. Happiness cannot be pursued. The more you aim, the more you’ll miss.

Life is not primarily a quest for pleasure, but instead a search for love and significance.

In other words, you will find happiness when you find a reason to be happy. Once you find that reason, happiness follows automatically.

The greatest challenge is to find meaning. Here’s how… Continue reading “How to be Happy — Success, Money and Happiness”

Budgeting Sucks — Do This Instead: Regardless If You Earn $50K or $1,000,000

budgeting surf

Budgeting is a lot like dieting.

They both work in theory, but in the real world they are almost worthless.

Surprisingly, the secret to controlling spending is to abandon strict and impossible rules.

And forget the complicated online programs too.

Few people are disciplined enough to track their spending, but more importantly, monitoring expenses does little to change behavior.

If you track your restaurant purchases, for example, and discover you spend $300 a month, what does that tell you? It does not answer how much you value eating out and arbitrary historical numbers do little to modify your spending.

Perhaps the $300 is a frivolous waste, or maybe restaurants are the only place your family gets quality time together. In this case, the $300 a month may be the most important thing you buy. What’s outrageous to some families is insignificant to others.

Instead of boring recording keeping, you need to figure out what is really important to you. Your buying choices when funds are limited is what brings your true values to the surface.

The system that works best for most people… Continue reading “Budgeting Sucks — Do This Instead: Regardless If You Earn $50K or $1,000,000″