Shots Fired — New Book Release

Antipolice media propaganda has deceived the public and turned decent citizens against the police officers who risk their lives to protect them.

The media narrative about officer‐involved shootings is very different from the reality. Typical racist headlines like “White Cop Shoots Black Man” are often the only exposure law‐abiding citizens have to police officers.

Most people have never been in a physical fight, let alone a life‐or‐death shooting, so they are left with Hollywood and media fiction to educate them about law enforcement shootings.

The perception is that cops are cavalier about shooting people, but from the 12 real‐life accounts in this book, you will discover law enforcement shootings are far more complicated and the consequences are greater than most people will ever understand.

Each fascinating chapter in this book illustrates how shootings occur under intense pressure, with limited information, and in rapidly evolving situations.

Law enforcement demands a tough exterior, but officer‐involved shootings are extremely traumatic. Officers risk not only being killed but also imprisonment, loss of employment, public slander, marriage and family turmoil, and severe health issues.

The psychology behind an officer‐involved shooting is the part of the story that is missing from the public narrative. What happens in the officer’s head before, during, and after a shooting is the story that is rarely told.

Police officers, like all humans, make less‐than‐perfect decisions and occasionally stumble with significant mistakes. That said, in virtually every law enforcement shooting, the suspect’s actions drive the officer to shoot—it is not the other way around.

This book is for three kinds of people:

  1. Cops who have been in a shooting
  2. Cops who could be in a shooting
  3. Civilians who want to understand police shootings

Law enforcement culture penalizes officers for showing vulnerability, so it can be easy to feel alone when experiencing the trauma that follows killing another human. This book shares the story that officers do not get to tell, and it will prepare others who have not yet been forced to pull the trigger.

I Waited Too Long to Kill Him: How Indecision Can Be Fatal

how to make a decision

The dreams are less frequent with time, but they still haunt me.

This dream is real and the stakes were high.

Perhaps our dreams are a message—our subconscious trying slap us in the face.

This one is about indecision.

I probably should have died.

Those are the stakes when you start to pull the trigger.

This stuff makes me uncomfortable to talk about. 

In fact, I’m not sure if you can handle it because most pretend this doesn’t happen. But it does and it requires a different perspective on life.

Let me tell you the story. Continue reading “I Waited Too Long to Kill Him: How Indecision Can Be Fatal”

The Battle Between Warriors and the Public

IMG_8889-2In the middle of the morning, the 911 calls flooded in reporting a man at busy shopping center frantically waving a butcher knife.

When the officers arrived, the Hispanic man was yelling while holding the knife against his own throat.

The cops stood back and tried to talk the man down.

Hostile crowds started to form and they launched into the usual anti‐police rhetoric.

The police did not create the incident, but they were forced to deal with it. They were in a no win situation.

Ignoring the man would leave the public at risk, but to communicate, the officers had to enter the deadly 21 foot range – a distance the untrained public knows nothing about.

The public dismisses the dangers of knives, but cops know the fatality rates of stabbing and shooting victims are similar.

The police were always split seconds behind, forced to play defense as they aimed a mixture of firearms and less‐lethal bean bag weapons.

The officers patiently negotiated until he started wildly stabbing himself with the large knife. Continue reading “The Battle Between Warriors and the Public”

Police Beatings: Balancing Anarchy and Tyranny

A Seattle police officer punched a woman in the face during a jaywalking stop.

The officer tried to detain the jaywalker, but she pulled away and started yelling, which agitated the hostile crowd that began to circle the officer.

A second woman entered the scene. She pushed the officer to help her resisting friend escape.

The officer immediately punched the second woman in the face, removing her from the picture as he continued struggling with the first woman.

The crowd got angry and so did Bill O’Reilly who is often pro police.

Video Below

Continue reading “Police Beatings: Balancing Anarchy and Tyranny”